Welcome to Cleveland!

 

As you arrive through the main United Airlines Concourse C at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, let me welcome you to the great city of Cleveland with pride as Cleveland-Marshall Law/Cleveland State University's own!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concert by GRAMMY® Winning pianist Angelin Chang: Celebrating the 38th Anniversary of the IPSA Research Committee on Asian and Pacific Studies (RC18)

MONTREAL 2014 - PALAIS DES CONGRES

 

 

Special Session

Angelin Chang, GRAMMY® Award Winning pianist and Co-Chair of RC18, presents a music concert of classical piano repertoire. She is the first pianist of Asian heritage to win a GRAMMY®, as well as the first American female awarded. As a 35th Anniversary initiative, the Research Committee on Asian and Pacific Studies (RC18) is establishing a foundation to encourage scholarship in this growing area for IPSA Congress participation. An active IPSA participant since the Paris 1985 World Congress, Dr. Angelin Chang Co-Chairs RC18 with Dr. Teh-Kuang Chang, RC18 Chair and Founder. Angelin Chang is Professor of Law and Professor of Music at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law and Cleveland State University, Ohio, U.S.A. Dr. Teh-Kuang Chang is Professor of Political Science and initiated the International Studies Association at Ball State University, Indiana, U.S.A. The Research Committee on Asian and Pacific Studies was established at the 1976 IPSA World Congress in Edinburgh, United Kingdom, and held its first panel on Asian Studies at the1979 Moscow World Congress, an IPSA turning point to extend beyond the European-American tradition.

 

Concert by GRAMMY® Winning pianist Angelin Chang: Celebrating the 38th Anniversary of the IPSA Research Committee on Asian and Pacific Studies (RC18)
Monday, July 21 - 7 p.m.


http://www.ipsa.org/my-ipsa/events/montreal2014/special/concert-angelin-chang

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cleveland Museum of Art - Classical Piano Recital Series (CCC) - March 24, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRAMMY 365 CHICAGO

CHICAGO BOARD MEMBERS MAKE BEAUTIFUL MUSIC - March 7, 2011

Submitted by BillyBranch on March 7, 2011 - 1:00am

 

Blues fans and Blues musicians from around the world come to Artis' Lounge, Billy Branch's home base on the Southside of Chicago. It's become a pilgrimage for international fans who come for an up close and personal Chicago Blues experience. Week after week, you never know who will pop in: Sugar Blue, Ronnie Baker Brooks, Eddie Shaw, Lonnie Brooks, Wayne Baker Brooks, Mark Hummel, Kenny Neal, Susanna Baca (Peruvian super star), El Tri (Mexican super stars). It's always a surprise and it is always unbelievable magic.

 

On March 7, GRAMMY winning classical pianist and Chicago Chapter board member Angelin Chang sat in with three-time GRAMMY nominee and fellow Chicago Chapter board member Billy Branch & the Sons of Blues at Artis' Lounge. This was a meeting of two very different genres for a unique experience that delighted both the audience and the musicians alike. First, Chang got up to play a classical piece that wowed the Blues audience. Then she and Ariyo, Billy's keyboard player, delighted the crowd with an impromtu duet accompanying Howlin Wolf's sax player, Eddie Shaw on vocals, and Billy Branch on harp .

 

It was obvious that Angelin and Billy's piano player, Ariyo, hit it off instantly, as he began his classical training at the age of three. He is an accomplished jazz and classical musician, but his heart and soul goes into his energetic, inspired Chicago Blues. The vibe at Artis' on Monday nights is always contagious, but this particular night provided a special spark of joy.      

 

 

 

 

Noteworthy Achievement (Ohio Magazine) - January, 2008


Cleveland State University Professor and Grammy Award-winner Angelin Chang credits a beloved mentor for her success.
Author:Linda Feagler

Related Categories: Music/Concerts; NORTHEAST
January 2008 Issue

As she settled into the seat next to her parents at the Staples Center in Los Angeles last February for the 49th annual Grammy Awards, Chang pinched herself in disbelief. The Cleveland State University associate professor of music had spent the weekend hobnobbing with recording artists ranging from soul-music legend Ike Turner to alternative-rock star Imogen Heap.

Now, the moment she hadn't been able to stop thinking about for two months had arrived: the announcement of the Grammy for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra. Her piano presentation of Olivier Messiaen Oiseaux Exotiques (Exotic Birds), recorded with the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, was among the nominees.

Throughout the evening, I was engaged in a tangled mental tug-of-war,” Chang recalls today. “First, I'd think, It doesn't matter if you win or lose, it´s just great to be here, followed by What if it does happen? followed by It probably won´t happen,  followed by Don´t get your hopes up followed by Oh no. If I win, I´ll have to say something.

She did receive the coveted prize and the speech that followed was heartfelt.

To Chang, composer Messiaen was not only a groundbreaking musician who incorporated the sounds of nature into his works before his death in 1992. He was also a beloved mentor who taught her how to embrace the beauty of music.

I would have to say that being able to pay tribute to your professor the person who has given you so much really means a lot, Chang says softly. She´s perched on a stool next to the Steinway grand piano that, along with a Yamaha, occupies half her office space at CSU. It´s really beyond words to me.

Chang´s introduction to the piano was, she says, clearly a diversionary tactic devised by her parents to quiet their 4-year-old daughter. The Muncie, Indiana, family was attending a formal dinner party, and as the adults conversed and childhood boredom set in, Chang wandered off to explore the host’s house.

When she entered the music room, fate intervened.

I was fascinated by this big black thing I had never seen before,” she recalls with a smile. Our host´s wife was a musician and she started playing, and then taught me a little something.

For the rest of the night, I was a really good girl, an angel. And so my parents thought, Oh, OK, that´s what she was looking for. This will keep her out of trouble. Little did they know, she laughs.

What followed were formative years filled with music lessons at Ball State University, where her father taught international relations. Unlike many children who must be cajoled into practicing, Chang couldn’t tear herself away from the piano. She credits her parents and teachers with nurturing her talent by encouraging individual creativity, a pay-it-forward process she engages in with her own students.

I´ve been so fortunate to have great people in my life who have shared their love of music with me,” Chang says. They believed in giving knowledge, yet not stifling talent.

That philosophy, now an integral part of all of Chang´s lesson plans, has stood the thirtysomething professor in good stead throughout her musical career, which includes helping launch the Performing Arts for Everyone series of free music and dance programs at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., and acceptance to the renowned Paris Conservatoire in 1987, where she was one of 300 piano students vying for admittance.

Competition was fierce, with only a dozen spots open on the class roster. Candidates were given three weeks to produce a program filled with music most had never played, much less heard before. For Chang, that included Beethoven's final sonata, Opus 111, which she describes as one of the most difficult works she ever attempted.

¨I knew,¨ Chang admits, ¨that the chances of getting in were slim.¨

But it happened, she adds, ¨as if by magic.¨

And it was there that she met the couple who would help her fine-tune her musical style and serve as the inspiration for her Grammy success: composer Olivier Messiaen, whom Chang ranks in stature with Debussy and Ravel, and his wife, Yvonne Loriod-Messiaen, who became her piano teacher.

Chang recalls that even though there is strict adherence at the Conservatoire to how music should be performed, Loriod-Messiaen wouldn´t hesitate to make corrections to her husband´s scores. The teacher often used her arms and fists to evoke emotion, and it was not uncommon for her to play with more than one finger on a key.

¨To Madame Loriod, it was all about breaking rules when they need to be broken, and remembering to read between the lines,¨ Chang says.
It´ a technique, she explains, that´s particularly apparent in Oiseaux Exotiques. As avid ornithologists, the Messiaens traveled the world to not only view birds but to hear them, transforming the sounds they produced into musical notations.

To me, this not only demonstrated their passion, but also their musicianship ¨to be able to replicate nature sounds to the nth degree,¨ she says.

Chang was so impressed with his opus to nature that she wrote her dissertation about Messiaen while earning her Doctorate of Musical Arts at the Peabody Institute-Johns Hopkins University, and vowed to record the composition. It’s now part of a burgeoning discography, which includes music by Schumann, Chopin and Shostakovich.

Kudos have come from around the globe, including Britain’s Gramophone magazine, which called Chang´s artistry ¨alternately prismatic and pointed.¨

Chang smiles at the attention.

¨It´s great to have recognition and confirmation of your work,¨ she says simply. ¨But the true satisfaction comes in being able to see how the music touches people´s hearts.¨

For information about recordings and upcoming concerts, visit www.angelinchang.com.

 

 

 

How many other universities have a Grammy winner on the faculty?

- November 20, 2007

 

 

 

Grammy Artist Performs At Local School - May 23, 2007

Grammy Artist Performs At Local School

Wed, May 23, 2007. 05:24 PM

By: Kathryn Snodgrass
Students at McIntire Munson were treated to a special concert today for their efforts in helping victims of Hurricane Katrina.

Grammy award winning artist Angelin Chang, won the Grammy this past February for best instrumental soloist performance with an orchestra. She played the piano for the students and answered questions about the musical profession today as a reward for their donations to the charity organization called Musicares.

¨I want to leave them with a sincere sense of appreciation that one person, a few people can make a huge difference in the world whether that be through music or through their efforts, it was really touching and I want them to know that they´re really appreciated,¨explained Chang.

Jamie Smith, a sixth grader at McIntire Munson came up with the idea to have a bake sale to raise money for those affected by Hurricane Katrina.

I researched the Musicares and we sold Little Debbie snacks and had a jug that we asked for donations for during lunch and that´s what we did¨said Smith.

Students raised $200 for musicians affected by Hurricane Katrina.
http://www.whizamfmtv.com/video.php?articleId=17991

 

 

 

History In The Making - May, 2007

http://www.epitomemag.com/arts_music.htm
Arts: Music

History In The Making
Renowned CSU Pianist Wins Grammy Award
by Abigail Zemrock

Dr. Angelin Chang, internationally acclaimed concert pianist and an assistant professor of piano at Cleveland State University, has won a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra.

She was the only North American among the five musicians nominated in this category. The 49th annual Grammy Award winners were announced on February 11 in a live telecast from Los Angeles.

Dr. Chang won for her piano solo performance of Olivier Messiaen´s Oiseaux Exotiques (Exotic Birds) with the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, conducted by John McLaughlin Williams, who also won the Grammy. The piece, from the sixth volume of the Symphony´s Music That Dares to Explore series, was performed in Cleveland State´s Waetjen Auditorium and was recorded and engineered by Cleveland State audio engineer David Yost.

The Grammy nominating committee told conductor Williams that the recording quality was one of the best ever submitted in the classical category.

Dr. Chang has been head of keyboard studies and a faculty member at Cleveland State since 2001. She also is the coordinator for chamber music. At the time of the recording, the world–renown Cleveland Chamber Symphony had been in residence at Cleveland State University for 24 years.

Even before receiving the coveted Grammy nomination, her rendition of Oiseaux Exotiques won wide critical acclaim. The Gramophone (U.K.) noted her “alternately prismatic and pointed artistry” and found it “invariably excellent.” State Magazine characterized her performance as “dazzlingly pyrotechnic,” and the Plain Dealer called her a ¨vibrant soloist [who] managed the death´s defying writing with equal dash and subtlety.¨

Dr. Chang studied with Messiaen and Yvonne Loriod Messiaen in Paris and was awarded First Prizes in both piano and chamber music during the same year from the Conservatoire National Suprieur de Musique de Paris (Paris Conservatoire). While earning her Doctor of Musical Arts from Peabody Institute–Johns Hopkins University, she wrote her dissertation on Messiaen.

Recognized for her sense of poetry and technical brilliance, Dr. Chang performs in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America. Her concert tours have included the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, Severance Hall, St. Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Beijing Concert Hall, and the South African Broadcasting Corporation.

As the first Artist-in-Residence at the Kennedy Center, Dr. Chang participated in developing and launching the Arts for Everyone initiative. She has performed at the U.S. Department of State, for the United Nations Women´s Organization and before the Royal Family of Nepal. An active chamber musician, she performs regularly with the legendary violist Joseph de Pasquale, the de Pasquale String Quartet, and with members of the Philadelphia Orchestra and Cleveland Orchestra.

Dr. Chang has always pursued excellence, especially in education. Besides her Doctor of Musical Arts, she earned her Premier Prix-Piano and Premier Prix-Musique de Chambre from the Paris Conservatoire, Master of Music and Distinguished Performer Certificate from Indiana University, BA in French and Bachelor of Music from Ball State University, and highest honors upon graduation from the Interlochen Arts Academy.

Enriching the community through the arts is also important to Dr. Chang. She serves as the North America representative for the Festival Afro-Asiatique Mondial des Oeuvres de Solidarité (FAMOUS), and president of the Panafrican Music and Arts Festival/Piano Division. She is a member of the board of trustees for the Great Lakes Theater Festival, co-president of the Ohio Music Teachers Association Northeast District, and state coordinator for the Music Teachers National Association Young Artists Competition and Chamber Music Competition.

With her impressive talent, education and initiative, Dr. Angelin Chang is definitely a woman making history!

Visit www.angelinchang.net for a listing of her scheduled performances and to purchase her CDs.

 

 

 

April, 2007

CSU professor Angelin Chang is a remarkable pianist in all the various aspects of her instrument. This award--[Category 100--Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with Orchestra)]--shared with fellow-Clevelander John McLaughlin Williams, conductor of Cleveland Chamber Symphony, recognizes their amazing collaboration for Olivier Messiaen's "Oiseaux Exotiques" (Exotic Birds).

Kelly Ferjutz
http://www.furious.com/perfect/zappacleveland.html

 

 

 

 

49th Grammy Awards Nominees for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with Orchestra) - March 9, 2007

Category 100
Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with Orchestra)

Brahms: The Piano Concertos
Nelson Freire;
Riccardo Chailly, conductor; (Gewandhausorchester)
[Decca]

Henze: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 And 3
Peter Sheppard Skaerved;
Christopher Lyndon-Gee, conductor; (Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra)
[Naxos]

Messiaen: Oiseaux Exotiques (Exotic Birds)
Angelin Chang;
John McLaughlin Williams, conductor; (Cleveland Chamber Symphony)
Track from: Cleveland Chamber Symphony: Music That Dares To Explore, Vol. 6
[TNC]

Rachmaninov: Piano Concertos 1 & 2
Leif Ove Andsnes;
Antonio Pappano, conductor; (Berliner Philharmoniker)
[EMI Classics]

Schmidt: Concertos
Ulla Miilmann;
Ole Schmidt, conductor; (Danish National Symphony Orchestra / DR)
[Dacapo Records]

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WCPN Interview - Around Noon - March 2, 2007

http://www.wcpn.org/podcast/audio/2007/03/0302an.mp3
March 2, 2007
Live
Interview with Dee Perry,
Around Noon
WCPN 90.3FM

 

 

 

IU Jacobs School of Music scores at Grammys - February 23, 2007

http://info.music.indiana.edu/web/page/normal/4986.html
The Indiana University Jacobs School of Music intended to make some noise at the 49th Annual Grammy Awards on February 11, and make some noise it did. At least five Jacobs alumni and one former faculty member brought home the coveted golden gramophone on "music's biggest night."

Internationally acclaimed concert pianist and alumna Angelin Chang, won this year's Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra for her piano solo performance of Olivier Messiaen's Oiseaux Exotiques (Exotic Birds) with the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, conducted by John McLaughlin Williams, who also won the Grammy. Born and raised in Muncie, IN, and now an assistant professor of piano at Cleveland State University, Chang was the only American nominated in that category this year. She studied with Menahem Pressler and György Sebök while at IU.

 

 

 

Angelin Chang & CCS Wins Grammy Award - February 14, 2007

Cleveland gets a bump in the musical world with the Grammy awarded to CSU professor Angelin Chang, pianist extraordinaire. This award for Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance with Orchestra is shared with fellow-Clevelander John McLaughlin Williams, conductor of Cleveland Chamber Symphony. We here at Cool Cleveland would like to congratulate Chang and the CCS. Way to represent!

CHQ

This entry was posted on Tuesday, February 13th, 2007 at 8:43 PM and filed under Random Cool. Follow comments here with the RSS 2.0 feed. Post a comment or leave a trackback.
3 Responses to “Angelin Chang & CCS Wins Grammy Award

1. Jill said:

This IS so cool. My son's viola teacher is in the CCS and she was ecstatic about the win. It was so fun listening to her tell us all about it, what it meant, what the group has been through and so on. Very very proud.
Posted on 14-Feb-07 at 7:39 am | Permalink
2. Lori said:

Kudos to Angelin and CCS!
Posted on 14-Feb-07 at 9:16 am | Permalink
3. Peter Chakerian said:

Indeed, it is a very cool piece of music. Certainly a well-deserved win too — the CCS is an impressive group of individuals who often don’t get the name recognition that the Cleveland Orchestra does. And Chang is a very sweet person, to boot — couldn’t have happened to better folks.
Posted on 14-Feb-07 at 10:59 am | Permalink

CoolCleveland.com

 

 

 

WKYC video clips - February 13, 2007

http://www.wkyc.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=63052
http://www.wkyc.com/video/player.aspx?aid=30972&bw=


http://www.wkyc.com/news/news_article.aspx?storyid=62612
http://www.wkyc.com/video/player.aspx?aid=30582&bw=
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Renowned Pianist Angelin Chang wins Grammy Award - February 12, 2007

News Release #14212
February 12, 2007
Contact: Mary Grodek
216.687.2290 | pr@csuohio.edu


Angelin Chang, internationally acclaimed concert pianist and an assistant professor of piano at Cleveland State University, has won a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra.


She was the only North American among the five musicians nominated in this category. The 49th Annual Grammy Award winners were announced on February 11, 2007 at a live telecast from Los Angeles.

Chang won for her piano solo performance of Olivier Messiaen's "Oiseaux Exotiques" (Exotic Birds) with the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, conducted by John McLaughlin Williams, who also won the Grammy. The piece, from the sixth volume of the Symphony's "Music That Dares to Explore" series, was performed in Cleveland State's Drinko Hall and was recorded and engineered by Cleveland State audio engineer David Yost.

Even before receiving the coveted Grammy nomination, Chang’s rendition of Oiseaux Exotiques won wide critical acclaim. The Gramophone (U.K.) noted her “alternately prismatic and pointed artistry” and found it "invariably excellent." State Magazine characterized her performance as “dazzlingly pyrotechnic," and The Plain Dealer called her a “vibrant soloist [who] managed the death-defying writing with equal dash and subtlety."

Chang studied with Messiaen and Yvonne Loriod-Messiaen in Paris and was awarded First Prizes in both piano and chamber music during the same year from the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris (Paris Conservatoire). While earning her Doctor of Musical Arts from Peabody Institute-Johns Hopkins University, she wrote her dissertation on Messiaen.

Recognized for her sense of poetry and technical brilliance, Chang performs in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America. Her concert tours have included the Kennedy Center (Washington, D.C.), Lincoln Center (New York), Severance Hall (Cleveland), St. Martin-in-the-Fields (London), Beijing Concert Hall (China), and the South African Broadcasting Corporation.

As the first Artist-in-Residence at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Chang participated in developing and launching the Arts for Everyone initiative. She has performed at the U.S. Department of State, for the United Nations Women's Organization and before the Royal Family of Nepal. An active chamber musician, she performs regularly with the legendary violist Joseph de Pasquale, The de Pasquale String Quartet, and with members of the Philadelphia Orchestra and Cleveland Orchestra.

Chang has been head of keyboard studies and faculty member at Cleveland State University since 2001, where she is also coordinator for chamber music. Previously, she was on the piano faculty at Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey.

Recent CDs include Soaring Spirit (Albany Records) with Chang on piano and Joseph de Pasquale on viola, and Cleveland Chamber Symphony (TNC) with Chang as piano soloist in Messiaen's Oiseaux Exotiques and Shostakovich's Piano Concerto No. 1.

She earned her Premier Prix-Piano and Premier Prix-Musique de Chambre from the Paris Conservatoire, Master of Music and Distinguished Performer Certificate from Indiana University, BA in French and Bachelor of Music from Ball State University, and highest honors upon graduation from the Interlochen Arts Academy.

Chang serves as the North America representative for the Festival Afro-Asiatique Mondial des Oeuvres de Solidarité (FAMOUS), and president of the Panafrican Music and Arts Festival/Piano Division. She is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland, co-president of the Ohio Music Teachers Association Northeast District, and state coordinator for the Music Teachers National Association Young Artists Competition and MTNA Chamber Music Competition.

Strategically located in the heart of one of America's most vibrant cultural centers, the Department of Music at Cleveland State utilizes the city's rich musical resources to provide students with a complete spectrum of educational opportunities. The University draws from the internationally renowned Cleveland Orchestra and other noted professional organizations, giving students the opportunity to study with some of the finest musicians in the world.

For more information, please call Cleveland State's Department of Marketing and Public Affairs at 216.687.2290.

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GRAMMY® Results - February 11, 2007

Category 100

Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with Orchestra)
(Award to the Instrumental Soloist(s) and to the Conductor.)

* Brahms: The Piano Concertos
Riccardo Chailly, conductor; Nelson Freire (Gewandhausorchester)
[Decca]

* Henze: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 And 3
Christopher Lyndon-Gee, conductor; Peter Sheppard Skaerved (Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra)
[Naxos]

* Messiaen: Oiseaux Exotiques (Exotic Birds)
Angelin Chang, piano soloist (Cleveland Chamber Symphony) John McLaughlin Williams, conductor
Track from: Cleveland Chamber Symphony: Music That Dares To Explore, Vol. 6
[TNC]

* Rachmaninov: Piano Concertos 1 & 2
Antonio Pappano, conductor; Leif Ove Andsnes (Berliner Philharmoniker)
[EMI Classics]

* Schmidt: Concertos
Ole Schmidt, conductor; Ulla Miilmann (Danish National Symphony Orchestra / DR)
[Dacapo Records]

 

 

 

Grammy-nominated pianist studied with French composer - February 9, 2007

Grammy-nominated pianist studied with French composer

FINE ARTS / Q&A

Friday, February 09, 2007
Pianist Angelin Chang, center, studied with French composer Olivier Messiaen, left, and his wife, pianist Yvonne Loriod-Messiaen, while a student at the Paris Conservatory in the late 1980s.

Concert pianist Angelin Chang, head of the keyboard area and an assistant professor at Cleveland State University, will be in Los Angeles on Sunday to attend the 49th annual Grammy Awards ceremony.

Chang, along with conductor John McLaughlin Williams and the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, is nominated in the best instrumental soloist(s) performance (with orchestra) category for her recording of Olivier Messiaen's "Oiseaux Exotiques." The recording is part of the Cleveland Chamber Symphony's six-CD set of performances on the TNC Music label.

A native of Muncie, Ind., Chang studied French and music at Ball State University. She worked with French composer Messiaen (1908-92) while studying at the Paris Conservatory in the late 1980s.

Her piano teacher there was Yvonne Loriod-Messiaen, the composer's wife. Chang later studied at Indiana University with Menahem Pressler and Baltimore's Peabody Conservatory.

The Cleveland Chamber Symphony recording of "Oiseaux Exotiques," made in 2004 at CSU and engineered by the university's David Yost, is the only American entry in its Grammy category. The other nominated recordings are from Germany and Denmark.

Before heading to Los Angeles, Chang spoke about the thrill of the Grammy nomination and her relationship with the Messiaens.

What is your reaction to the Grammy nomination?

It's so special that this is a Cleveland project. We did the performance here, recording here and the musicians are here. It's something we did. It's not something that's been promoted and hyped up. It's been recognized for what it is. It's not an individual recognition. It's recognition for all of us here.

What did you study with Messiaen in Paris?

He did different things -- composition, analysis, master classes. I remember that was around the time of his 80th birthday. He was fantastic. He had such a lucid mind. He was physically weak, but the way he spoke, the way he would analyze and talk about music, was just illuminating.

I understand you didn't study "Oiseaux Exotiques" with Messiaen, but what did you glean from playing some of his other works for him?

One of the milestones for me was how he saw color. The modes were so vivid for him. To be able to see and relate to those tonal centers and colors was really helpful.

What impact did Loriod-Messiaen have on you?

She was a wonderful teacher, very much like a mother figure. I didn't have a piano and had to practice after hours [at the conservatory]. One day, she gave me a fanny pack for my valuables and Mace spray so that I would be OK when I went home on the Metro.

What were your activities while serving as artist-in-residence at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., after finishing your doctorate at Peabody?

Chamber music, solo and educational components, which are very important to me. I think it's vital not only to perform, but also to give back things we enjoyed in life. I've been very blessed with what I've received from my teachers. I want to make sure it doesn't end there.

I understand Madame Loriod-Messiaen heard the recording of "Oiseaux Exotiques." What was her reaction?

She was very impressed with it. That was touching for me.

Any vibrations that the recording will win the Grammy?

We know it's a great product. But to actually be recognized is really something. We're already winners, no matter how you look at it. -- Donald Rosenberg


© 2007 The Plain Dealer

© 2007 cleveland.com All Rights Reserved.

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2007

Benefit for Cleveland Chamber Symphony

Let's say you attended the free Sunday evening concert by the Cleveland Chamber Symphony and really enjoyed it. To help pay for such programs, the symphony is holding a benefit tonight with special guest, Grammy-winning pianist Angelin Chang, an international superstar and former artist-in-residence at DC's Kennedy Center who now heads the keyboard studies program at Cleveland State University. Taking place at Budapest Blonde (6901 Rockside Rd., Independence), an elegant little wine bar also known for its specialty martinis, the event features a martini tasting, hors d'oeuvres and an auction. Tickets are $75 per person or $125 per couple. Space is limited so call 440.237.0292 or e-mail blonde@earthlink.net to reserve now. - AP
arts@freetimes.com

 

 

Pianist Angelin Chang - Grammy nomination (Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra) - December, 2006

http://www.csuohio.edu/news/releases/2006/12/14163.html
News Release #14163
December 12, 2006
Contact: Mary Grodek
216.687.2290 | pr@csuohio.edu


Renowned pianist at Cleveland State nominated for Grammy Award

Dr. Angelin Chang, internationally acclaimed concert pianist and an assistant professor of piano at Cleveland State University, has been nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Soloist Performance with Orchestra.

Chang was nominated for her performance of Olivier Messiaen's Oiseaux Exotiques with the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, conducted by John McLaughlin Williams and recorded and engineered by Cleveland State audio engineer David Yost.

She is the only North American among the five musicians nominated in this category. The 49th Annual Grammy Award winners will be announced on February 11, 2007 at a live telecast from Los Angeles.

Chang studied with Messiaen and Yvonne Loriod-Messiaen in Paris and was awarded First Prizes in both piano and chamber music during the same year from the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique de Paris (Paris Conservatoire). While earning her Doctor of Musical Arts from Peabody Institute-Johns Hopkins University, she wrote her dissertation on Messiaen.

Even before receiving the coveted Grammy nomination, Chang's rendition of Oiseaux Exotiques won wide critical acclaim. The Gramophone (U.K.) noted her “alternately prismatic and pointed artistry and found it invariably excellent. State Magazine characterized her performance as dazzlingly pyrotechnic, and The Plain Dealer called her a vibrant soloist [who] managed the death-defying writing with equal dash and subtlety.

Recognized for her sense of poetry and technical brilliance, Chang performs in Europe, Asia, Africa and North and South America. Her concert tours have included the Kennedy Center (Washington, D.C.), Lincoln Center (New York), Severance Hall (Cleveland), St. Martin-in-the-Fields (London), Beijing Concert Hall (China), and the South African Broadcasting Corporation.

As the first Artist-in-Residence at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Chang participated in developing and launching the Arts for Everyone initiative. She has performed at the U.S. Department of State, for the United Nations Women's Organization and before the Royal Family of Nepal. An active chamber musician, she performs regularly with the legendary violist Joseph de Pasquale, The de Pasquale String Quartet, and with members of the Philadelphia Orchestra and Cleveland Orchestra.

She earned her Premier Prix-Piano and Premier Prix-Musique de Chambre from the Paris Conservatoire, Master of Music and Distinguished Performer Certificate from Indiana University, BA in French and Bachelor of Music from Ball State University, and highest honors upon graduation from the Interlochen Arts Academy.

Chang has been head of keyboard studies and faculty member at Cleveland State University since 2001, where she is also coordinator for chamber music. Previously, she was on the piano faculty at Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey.

Recent CDs include Soaring Spirit (Albany Records) with Chang on piano and Joseph de Pasquale on viola, and Cleveland Chamber Symphony (TNC) with Chang as piano soloist in Messiaen's “Oiseaux Exotiques” and Shostakovich's Piano Concerto No. 1.

Chang serves as the North America representative for the Festival Afro-Asiatique Mondial des Oeuvres de Solidarité (FAMOUS), and president of the Panafrican Music and Arts Festival/Piano Division. She is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland, co-president of the Ohio Music Teachers Association Northeast District, and state coordinator for the Music Teachers National Association Young Artists Competition and MTNA Chamber Music Competition.

Strategically located in the heart of one of America's most vibrant cultural centers, the Department of Music at Cleveland State utilizes the city's rich musical resources to provide students with a complete spectrum of educational opportunities. The University draws from the internationally renowned Cleveland Orchestra and other noted professional organizations, giving students the opportunity to study with some of the finest musicians in the world.

For more information, please call Cleveland State's Department of Marketing and Public Affairs at 216-687-2290.

© 2018 Angelin Chang. All rights reserved.